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Why do dogs drool?

When most people think of dog drool, they picture a slobbering, messy dog shaking its head from side to side. But not all dogs drool excessively, and there are a number of reasons why dogs might produce more saliva than usual.

One common reason is hunger or thirst. When a dog’s stomach is empty, it produces a hormone called ghrelin that signals the body to produce more saliva. This extra saliva helps to lubricate the digestive tract and makes it easier for food to move through the body.

Dogs can also drool when they smell something they find irresistible, such as a juicy steak or their owner’s lunch. In this case, the drooling is caused by an involuntary reflex known as the “drooling response.” When a dog smells something appetizing, its salivary glands start working overtime in anticipation of eating.

Some dogs simply have naturally loose or floppy lips that make it easy for saliva to escape. While excessive drooling can be messy, it’s usually nothing to worry about and is simply a sign that your dog is hungry, excited, or interested in something.

Emotions that make dogs drool

Dogs typically drool when they are excited, when they smell something delicious, when they are thirsty or hungry, when they see someone they love, or when they have a toothache.   Finally,  

Excitement

Excitement is the most common reason for dogs to drool. When they see their owner coming home, or when they know a walk is about to happen, dogs often start to drool with excitement.

Smell

Similarly, the smell of food can also trigger excitement-induced drooling. Smelling food can cause a dog to drool because they anticipate eating. Drooling also helps to lubricate the digestive tract to help things move more easily when they do finally get to take a bite of whatever they are sniffing that seems appetizing to them.

Thirst or Hunger

Dogs may also drool when they are thirsty or hungry in anticipation of being fed. When a dog’s stomach is empty, it produces a hormone called ghrelin that signals the body to produce more saliva. This extra saliva helps to lubricate the digestive tract and makes it easier for food to move through the body.

See Someone They Love

Some dogs may also drool when they see someone they love, such as their owner or another family member. This is usually a sign of excitement or happiness. If your dog drools when it sees you, take it as a compliment of their love for you.

Toothache

In rare cases, dogs may drool because of pain, such as when they have a toothache. However, this is usually accompanied by other signs of distress, such as pawing at the mouth or difficulty eating.

If your dog is drooling more than usual and you are unsure why it is always best to consult with a veterinarian to rule out any possible medical causes.

Breeds that drool

While all dogs have the ability to drool, some breeds are more prone to it than others. For instance, Bulldogs and Mastiffs are well-known for their drooling habits. This is due to their loose skin, which causes saliva to collect in their mouths.

Other breeds that tend to drool more than average include St Bernards, Newfoundlands, and bloodhounds. However, even within these breeds, there can be individual differences, with some dogs drooling more than others.

In general, dogs that have longer snouts are more likely to drool than those with shorter snouts. This is because they have more space in their mouths for saliva to collect.

There are a few ways to minimize drooling, such as wiping your dog’s face regularly and feeding them smaller meals. However, for the most part, you’ll just have to accept that some dogs are simply slobbery by nature!

Medical Conditions that Cause Excessive Drooling

Many dogs drool, but usually, it’s just a little saliva and isn’t anything to worry about. However, if your dog is drooling excessively, it could be a sign of a medical condition.

There are several conditions that can cause excessive drooling in dogs, including nausea, allergies, dental problems, and more. If your dog is drooling more than usual, it’s important to take them to the vet to rule out any serious health problems.

Nausea

Nausea is a common cause of excessive drooling in dogs. If your dog is feeling nauseous, they may drool more than usual.

Allergies

Allergies can also cause increased drooling, as the body tries to flush out the allergens by producing more saliva.

Dental Problems

Dental problems such as gingivitis and tooth infections can also lead to excessive drooling, as the bacteria from the infection can cause irritation and inflammation.

If your dog is drooling excessively, make an appointment with your vet to find out the cause and get treatment.

Ways to minimize drooling

Many dog owners are familiar with the problem of a dog drooling. While some drooling is normal, excessive drooling can be a nuisance and even indicate a medical problem.

If your dog is drooling more than usual, there are some steps you can take to minimize the problem.

  1. Consider your dog’s diet. Some foods, including spicy or acidic dishes, can cause increased drooling.
  2. You may also want to try feeding your dog smaller meals more frequently throughout the day.
  3. Another option is to provide your dog with ice chips or ice cubes to help ease discomfort and reduce drooling.
  4. If your dog is prone to motion sickness, try taking him for shorter car rides or using an anti-nausea medication before travel.

By taking these steps, you can help to keep your dog’s drooling under control.

Conclusion

All dogs drool. Some dog breeds drool more than others, and some individual dogs drool more than others. However, excessive drooling can be a sign of a medical condition and should be checked out by a veterinarian. There are also steps you can take to minimize drooling, but sometimes you just have to live with slobbery dog kisses.